Become a Culturally Committed Member

Bringing 'Uy Sqwalawun' to your Practice
I raise my hands to your desire to improve the cultural safety of your practice. Culturally Committed is here to support you on your journey.

Professional Membership

This membership is for providers who offer direct services to Indigenous client. Providers will have the opportunity to promote their Culturally Committed identity via printed, physical, and digital resources. They will also have access to client feedback that can be utilized to improve the cultural safety of their practice.

Benefits of our Professional Membership

  • LIVE Monthly Virtual workshop focused on topics related to Cultural Safety and Humility

  • LIVE Monthly Community Call, where members can engage with Culturally Committed Mentors, ask questions and share
  • INCLUSION on the Culturally Committed Providers Map: a resource the general public can utilize to seek providers who are committed to improving the cultural safety of their practice

  • Professional Members will have access to confidential client feedback, which can be submitted by clients through the Culturally Committed website
  • ACCESS to digital logo to use on your personal website, promotional materials
  • ACCESS to the Culturally Committed Members Portal, which houses the complete library of Workshops and Community Calls
  • Professional Members will receive a providers pin, window decal, and 8x10 poster to promote their Culturally Committed identity
  • ACCESS to printable feedback cards to support clients in navigating the feedback process
  • ACCESS to the private Culturally Committed Members Facebook Group, where individuals can come together collectively, and share thoughts, questions, successes, and challenges

In order for Culturally Committed Providers to maintain a listing on the Providers Map, they need to demonstrate an ongoing commitment to improving the cultural safety of their practice through active participation in the Culturally Committed Membership Program. 

Annual
Month to Month

Active Ally Membership

This membership is for individuals who are seeking opportunities learn about cultural safety and humility, and be active in their pursuit towards reconciliation.

Ally is an action word; it's not who you are -- it's what you do.

Benefits of the our Active Ally Membership

  • LIVE Monthly Virtual workshop focused on topics related to Cultural Safety and Humility

  • LIVE Monthly Community Call, where members can come together virtually and connect with the Culturally Committed Mentors.
  • Access to the private Culturally Committed Members Facebook Group, where individuals can come together collectively, and share thoughts, questions, successes, and challenges.

  • Access to the Culturally Committed Members Portal, which houses the complete library of Workshops and Community Calls
  • ACCESS to digital logo for use on your personal website and promotional materials
  • Members will be permitted to identify themselves as "Culturally Committed" in their communication materials, thereby demonstrating their humble mission towards improving the cultural safety of their practice.
Annual
Month to Month

Truth, Art, and Reconciliation

A workshop with Elder Daniel Elliott of Stz'uminus Nation

June 15 2022

 

Through this 2-hour workshop, Artist Daniel Elliott of Stz'uminus First Nation will invite listeners to participate in a viewing of his celebrated collection, 'Winds of Change'. Dan will guide participants through an arc of emotional scenes – from beautiful pre-contact, to the impacts of colonization, to his vision of how reconciliation can happen.

 

“I think all Canadians need to stop and take a look and not look away. Yeah, it’s embarrassing, yeah, it’s an ugly part of our history. We don’t want to know about it. What I want to see from the [Truth and Reconciliation] Commission is to rewrite the history books so that other generations will understand and not go through the same thing that we’re going through now, like it never happened.”

 

Daniel Elliott is a drug and alcohol counsellor, artist, and cultural worker and was born into the the Stz'uminus People on Vancouver Island. Dan has brought culture to many seeking it -- first in the Nanaimo public school system, and then to the Indigenous inmates of Nanaimo Correctional Centre. Now Dan supports those in his community seeking a healing path away from drug and alcohol use. He actively and frequently facilitates smudges, sweat lodges, and traditional cooking classes.

 

Please note: Replays will be available for 30 days from recording.

Register For Workshop

The Indian Act: A Two-Eyed Exploration

A workshop with Jenn Smith of Tlowitsis First Nation

July 20th and August 17th from 6-8pm PST

Part One 

We’ll begin by learning about the history of the Indian Act.

Timeline

  • 1857 The Gradual Civilization Act
  • 1867 Canada was born
  • 1876 - 19 years later, the Gradual Civilization Act became the Indian Act
  • Present day - the Indian Act continues to be a mechanism to categorize and control the lives of First Nations People from cradle to grave

The Indian Act is a Canadian federal law that governs in matters pertaining to Indian status, bands, and Indian reserves. It is the oldest piece of legislation, even pre-dating the ‘birth’ of Canada. By way of the Indian Act, the Canadian federal government regulates and administers in the affairs and lives of registered Indians and reserve communities. We’ll learn about how the Indian Act is a part of a long history of assimilation policies that intended to terminate the cultural, social, economic, and political distinctiveness of First Nations people by absorbing them into mainstream Canadian life and values.

 

Part Two

In this session we’ll focus on the historical and current-day impacts of the Indian Act. We’ll review colonial government systems (Bands), myths and stereotypes.

While the Indian Act has undergone numerous amendments since it was first passed in 1876, today it largely retains its original form. The Indian Act is administered by Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), formerly the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND). The Indian Act is and continues to be a mechanism to categorize and control the lives of First Nations People. It imposed great personal and cultural tragedy on First Nations, many of which continue to affect communities, families and individuals today.

 

Please note: Session replay will be available for 30 days from date of recording.

Register For Workshop